Cambridge Study Publications as of June 2012

  • David P. Farrington
  • Alex R. Piquero
  • Wesley G. Jennings
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Criminology book series (BRIEFSCRIMINOL)

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • David P. Farrington
    • 1
  • Alex R. Piquero
    • 2
  • Wesley G. Jennings
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of CriminologyUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  2. 2.Program in CriminologyUniversity of Texas at DallasDallasUSA
  3. 3.Department of CriminologyUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA

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