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Low-Dose Nonlinear Effects of Smoking on Coronary Heart Disease Risk

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Part of the International Series in Operations Research & Management Science book series (ISOR,volume 185)

Abstract

An emerging working hypothesis for some toxicologists and risk assessors is that many – perhaps most – biological dose–response relations exhibit J-shaped or U-shaped regions at low doses. That is, probability of harm (or, more generally, of exposure-related departures of variables from their “normal” levels) decreases with increasing dose at sufficiently small exposure levels, even if it increases with increasing doses at higher exposure levels. When this pattern holds, responses to low levels of exposures cannot necessarily be extrapolated from observed dose–response relations at higher doses.

Keywords

  • Environmental Tobacco Smoke
  • Response Relation
  • Coffee Consumption
  • Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure
  • High Exposure Level

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 2012 Louis Anthony Cox, Jr

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Cox, L.A. (2012). Low-Dose Nonlinear Effects of Smoking on Coronary Heart Disease Risk. In: Improving Risk Analysis. International Series in Operations Research & Management Science, vol 185. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6058-9_12

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