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Between Routine Police Checks and ‘Residual Practices of Expulsion Power’: The Impacts of the Anti-Terrorism Law on Phone Centres and the Resistance of Owners. An Italian Ethnography in the ‘Emergency Season’

Chapter
Part of the Immigrants and Minorities, Politics and Policy book series (IMPP)

Abstract

Since 9/11, enforcement officers in many EU countries have made extensive use of anti-terrorism preventive powers by carrying out repeated identity controls targeted at people they presumed to be Muslim. Individuals were frequently stopped in the streets, as well as in places considered to be likely terrorist targets, such as metro systems, train stations, commercial centres, predominantly Muslim neighbourhoods, halal restaurants and mosques (Open Society Institute 2009).

Keywords

Police Officer Police Force Local Police Undocumented Immigrant Undocumented Migrant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.VeronaItaly

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