Confirming Relevance: How American and Canadian Archaeologists Are Training Youth and Adults in Archaeology, Heritage Studies, and Community Partnerships

Chapter
Part of the One World Archaeology book series (WORLDARCH, volume 1)

Abstract

Over the last 25 years there has been a growing momentum for incorporating community outreach into archaeology and heritage studies in Canada and the USA. Innovative programs brought archaeological research to the public through: tours of sites, museum exhibits, traveling exhibits, public lectures, newspaper, magazine articles, and even archaeology programs for television (Jameson 1997; Herscher and McManamon 2000). Initially, these programs were based on what the archaeologist wanted to present to the public not the topics of interest to the public or professionals in allied fields (Jameson and Baugher 2007a: 4). Fortunately, archaeologists are now partnering with nonarchaeologists in order to develop more meaningful public programming in heritage studies (for example, Derry and Malloy 2003; Merriman 2004; Jameson and Baugher 2007b). This interdisciplinary outreach enables archaeologists to work cooperatively with historic preservationists, museum curators, and educators. This cooperative work enhanced both the quality of the public programs and the underlining interdisciplinary research. Even the term “public archaeology,” which used to be synonymous with Cultural Resource Management (CRM), now implies outreach work with and for the public.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Archaeology Program & Department of Landscape ArchitectureCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

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