Monitoring Food Company Marketing to Children to Spotlight Best and Worst Practices

  • Jennifer L. Harris
  • Megan Weinberg
  • Johanna Javadizadeh
  • Vishnudas Sarda
Chapter

Abstract

In 2006, the Council of Better Business Bureaus and ten of the largest children’s food marketers launched the Children’s Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative (CFBAI), an industry self-regulatory program for the purpose of “Changing the nutritional profile of food and beverage products in child-directed advertising” (BBB, 2009). These companies’ pledges were fully implemented by 2008, and as of August, 2011, 17 companies had joined the CFBAI. The food industry has declared the CFBAI a success, with companies exhibiting excellent compliance with their pledges and the number of food and beverage advertisements on children’s television programming falling by 50 % from 2004 to 2010 (BBB, 2010).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer L. Harris
    • 1
  • Megan Weinberg
    • 1
  • Johanna Javadizadeh
    • 1
  • Vishnudas Sarda
    • 1
  1. 1.Rudd Center for Food Policy and ObesityYale UniversityNew HavenUSA

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