Roots of Urban Transportation Planning

  • Edward Weiner
Chapter

Abstract

By the mid-1930s many of the substandard rural roads in the nation had been improved. The planning of these rural had been based primarily on traffic counts and capacity studies. However, when attention then shifted to improving urban roads, these tools were considered inadequate for planning. Planning urban roads was more complicated with complex travel patterns in an intensely developed urban fabric. As traffic grew in these urban areas, congested was becoming more common and the need for new approaches to analyzing and planning road improvements was needed.

Keywords

Burner Europe Transportation Production Line Defend 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward Weiner
    • 1
  1. 1.Silver SpringUSA

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