Health is Global: A UK Government Strategy 2008/2013

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter demonstrates how policy coherence at the national level can impact on bilateral, regional and multilateral diplomacy. The Labour government in the United Kingdom (UK) published a global health strategy (GHS) in 2008. The strategy set out a cross-government approach to protecting the health of the UK population, promoting the UK’s economy and security, whilst also promoting improvements in health abroad. It recognized that in an interdependent world where diseases know no borders health must be considered as a global and multidisciplinary issue. This case study outlines the development, aims, challenges and impact of the strategy and raises questions for readers about how national policy serves global health diplomacy.

Keywords

Migration Europe Influenza Coherence 

References

  1. Chatham House. (2010). Centre on Global Health Security. http://www.chathamhouse.org/research/global-health. Accessed on 15 Nov 2012.
  2. Department of Health. (2008). Health is Global: A UK global health strategy 2008–13. London, UK: Department of Health. http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/DH_088702. Accessed on 15 Nov 2012.
  3. Department of Health. (2011). Health is Global: an outcomes framework for global health 2011–15, London, UK. http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/DH_125605. Accessed on 15 Nov 2012.
  4. Mott Macdonald for the Department of Health. (2010). Annual independent review of the UK Government’s Global Health Strategy. http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/DH_118807. Accessed on 15 Nov 2012.

Further Reading

  1. Silberschmidt, G. (2009). The European approach to global health. Washington, USA: Centre for Strategic and International Studies. http://csis.org/files/publication/091112_Silberschmidt_EuroApproach_Web.pdf. Accessed on 15 Nov 2012.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Imperial CollegeLondonUK
  2. 2.NHS DevonExeterUK
  3. 3.The Royal Institute of International AffairsCentre on Global Health Security, Chatham HouseLondonUK

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