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Reaccentuating Representivity in Greensboro

  • James Edward BeitlerIII
Chapter
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Part of the Springer Series in Transitional Justice book series (SSTJ)

Abstract

This chapter analyzes the discourse surrounding the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s public events—its calls for participation, Swearing In and Seating Ceremony, three public hearings, and Report Release Ceremony—to demonstrate how the commissioners reaccentuated the organizational rhetoric of past truth commissions to position the Commission, and the truth commission process in general, as representative of the Greensboro community at large. However, even as they established their representivity, commissioners also highlighted the ways in which they were unrepresentative of the community. Creating this tension enabled commissioners both to identify themselves with community members and to establish themselves as a model of interaction and reconciliation for the community.

Keywords

Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission Reaccentuation Representivity Organizational rhetoric Rhetorical tradition Public hearings Ethos Reconciliation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Edward BeitlerIII
    • 1
  1. 1.Feinstein College of Arts and SciencesRoger Williams UniversityBristolUSA

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