Measures of Reading Achievement

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter presents the data related to reading skills for the VL2 Psychometric Toolkit Project. The data were generated using multiple reading tasks, including Reading Fluency and Paragraph Comprehension from the Woodcock-Johnson III (WJ-III) Tests of Achievement as well as the Reading Comprehension from the Peabody Individual Achievement Test-Revised (PIAT-R) and the Test of Silent Word Reading Fluency (TOSWRF). The sample was comprised of deaf college students evaluated as part of the VL2 Psychometric Toolkit. In addition to providing descriptive statistics, correlations with a brief measure of nonverbal intelligence and measures of executive, visuospatial, memory, and linguistic functioning and other areas of academic achievement administered concurrently as part of the VL2 Toolkit are presented. The relationships observed are discussed in the context of both research in the general population and, when available, previous research with deaf individuals.

Keywords

Kelly 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyGallaudet UniversityWashingtonUSA

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