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Drug Abuse and Drug Trafficking in Asia

Chapter

Abstract

Asia, the world’s largest and most populous continent, has a long history of opium cultivation. The two largest opium and heroin producers, Afghanistan and Myanmar, are both located on the continent. Asia is also the largest cannabis producer in the world. After decades of changes in drug use culture, Asia, specifically Southeast Asia, is now the world’s largest amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) producer. Illicit drugs produced in Asia are consumed inside the region or trafficked to other continents, which raises the significant social, political, and legal consequences for Asia and beyond. The purpose of this chapter is to briefly provide historical background and current statistics for drug production, trafficking, and consumption in Asia; to discuss the consequent responses of the criminal justice system; and to access the effectiveness of ongoing anti-drug policies in selected countries.

Keywords

Drug User Illicit Drug Drug Trafficking Heroin User Drug Treatment Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.California State UniversityStanislausUSA

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