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Modern Masters

  • Richard Colgan
Chapter

Abstract

Three physicians have been chosen from the modern era for their unique contributions to the art of medicine. Dr. Theodore Woodward, a renowned clinician–scientist, has taught the art of medicine to thousands of physicians over a career spanning decades. At the heart of his teachings has been the advice to always remember the patient in our desire to help them. Dr. Edmund Pellegrino, a bioethicist, reminds us that the physician is a moral agent who has a responsibility to be virtuous and that the good of each patient should be the goal of our actions. Dr. Paul Farmer has dedicated his life to focusing on the inequality of health care for the most vulnerable members of our society. In addition to serving the poor one patient at a time, Farmer forces us to look at structural violence, which is disproportionately realized by the poorer and weaker members of our planet. The lessons from these three modern masters are unified in that they call for healers to serve patients with humility, virtuosity, and civility. This chapter closes with Unsung Heroes and Heroines—a look at the lives of several clinicians who exemplify what it means to be healer without fame. These modern masters add to the art of caring by way of their individual philosophy, teachings, and as exemplified by their life’s work. Each has found his (or her) own Lambaréné.

Keywords

Patient Relationship Structural Violence Maryland School Ethyl Chloride Hippocratic Oath 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Further Reading and Resources

  1. Pellegrino ED, Thomasma DC. A philosophical basis of medical practice. Oxford: Oxford University Press; 1981.Google Scholar
  2. Pellegrino ED. Humanism and the physician. Knoxville, TN: The University of Tennessee Press; 1979.Google Scholar
  3. Pellegrino ED. The virtues in medical practice. Oxford: Oxford University Press; 1983.Google Scholar
  4. Kidder T. Mountains beyond mountains: the quest of Dr. Paul Farmer, a man who would cure the world. New York: Random House Trade Publications; 2004.Google Scholar
  5. Farmer P. Pathologies of power: health human rights, and the new war on the poor. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press; 2005.Google Scholar
  6. Farmer P. Infections and inequalities: the modern plagues. Berkeley, CA: The University of California Press; 1999.Google Scholar
  7. Farmer P. The uses of Haiti. Monroe, ME: Common Courage Press; 1994.Google Scholar
  8. Farmer P. AIDS and accusation: Haiti and the geography of Blame. California series in public anthropology. Berkeley, CA: The University of California Press; 1992.Google Scholar
  9. Ioannidis JPA. Why most published research findings are false. PLoS Med. 2005;2:e124.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Resource

  1. Information on partners in health, Boston, MA, can be found at www.pih.org

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard Colgan
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MarylandBaltimoreUSA

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