Skip to main content

Crime Prevention and Intervention Over the Life Course

  • Chapter
  • First Online:
Handbook of Life-Course Criminology

Abstract

A central tenant of the life course paradigm as applied to criminology is that the causes of the onset and termination of criminal behavior vary over different stages of the life course. Since crime prevention and intervention programs are designed to change these causal characteristics and conditions, it follows that effective crime prevention and intervention programs will likely target different causal factors for interventions involving children, adolescents, and adults. A scientific standard for identifying effective, evidence-based crime prevention programs and practices is proposed and programs meeting this standard are described. The risk and protective factors targeted by these programs and practices designed for children, adolescents, and adults are examined and differences and similarities across these stages of the life course are described.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this chapter

Subscribe and save

Springer+ Basic
EUR 32.99 /Month
  • Get 10 units per month
  • Download Article/Chapter or Ebook
  • 1 Unit = 1 Article or 1 Chapter
  • Cancel anytime
Subscribe now

Buy Now

Chapter
USD 29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD 129.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Softcover Book
USD 169.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Compact, lightweight edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info
Hardcover Book
USD 169.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Durable hardcover edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Institutional subscriptions

Similar content being viewed by others

Notes

  1. 1.

    The review process for the National Repository for Effective Prevention Programs (NREPP), SAMHSA, is one in which programs are submitted to the agency for review and may not include all available evaluations of that program.

  2. 2.

    The Society for Prevention Research has also proposed a standard which is much more complex and difficult to implement than the Federal Collaboration standard reviewed here. See http://www.preventionresearch.org.

  3. 3.

    The Working Group included members from the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, SAMSHA; The National Institute of Drug Abuse; The National Center for Education Evaluation, Institute of Education Sciences; the Office of Justice Programs, The National Institute of Justice; and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

  4. 4.

    See http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/220889.pdf. The classification proposed two levels of “effective” which are collapsed into a single category here. The distinction between “effective” and “effective with reservation” is that the replication for the latter need not be independent, i.e., can involve the same research team that conducted the original trial.

  5. 5.

    For this standard, sustainability is not necessarily post-intervention sustainability and independent replication is not required.

  6. 6.

    Program cost is problematic as a criterion for judging the scientific effectiveness of a program. Cost is clearly relevant to the decision to adopt a program, but even here, the issue is more a matter of the cost benefit than the absolute cost.

  7. 7.

    See http://www.coalition4evidence.org.

  8. 8.

    The Blueprints review process rates programs on the Federal Collaboration standard as well as the Blueprint standard but does not publish or disseminate these ratings. See http://www.Colorado.edu/cspv/Blueprints.

  9. 9.

    See http://www.thecochranelibrary.com.

  10. 10.

    See http://www.campbellcollaboration/crime_and_justice/index.pbp.

  11. 11.

    The Crime and Justice Group has adopted the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials to standardize the reporting of methodological information.

  12. 12.

    All three targeted antisocial behavior as well as child maltreatment/abuse, but abuse was the only behavioral outcome demonstrated for the Tripple-P Parenting Program.

  13. 13.

    Not counting CTC.

  14. 14.

    See http://www.campbellcollaboration.org; http://www.wsipp.wa.gov; (Lipsey & Wilson, 1998; Lipsey et al., 2007, 2010; Sherman, Farrington, Welsh, & MacKenzie, 2002; Tolan, Bass, Henry, & Schoeny, 2008; Welsh & Farrington, 2006a, 2006b; Wilson et al., 2000, 2001, 2006). Meta-analysis effect sizes of 0.20 and greater are considered significant effects for Table 17.3. Effect sizes of 0.15 and greater on the WSIPP Web site were included when statistically significant, the benefit–cost ratios were substantial and the probability of achieving a positive effect was 90 % or greater.

  15. 15.

    A Meta-analysis of early parent training by Bernazzani and Tremblay (2006) found mixed results and they recommend some caution regarding this practice for very young children.

References

  • Bernazzani, O., & Tremblay, R. E. (2006). Early parent training. In B. C. Welsh & D. Farrington (Eds.), Preventing crime (pp. 21–32). New York: Springer.

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • Biglan, A., & Ogden, T. (2008). The evolution of evidence-based practices. European Journal of Behavior Analysis, 9, 81–95.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bishop, D. (2000). Juvenile offenders in the adult criminal justice system. In M. Tonry (Ed.), Crime and justice: A review of research (pp. 81–168). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Brown, C. H., Berndt, D., Brinales, J., Zong, X., & Bhagwat, D. (2000). Evaluating the evidence of effectiveness for preventive interventions: Using a registry system to influence policy through science. Addictive Behaviors, 25, 955–964.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Elliott, D. S. (1994). Serious violent offenders: Onset, developmental course and termination. Criminology, 32, 1–21.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Elliott, D. S. (Ed.). (1997). Blueprints for violence prevention series. Boulder, CO: Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence, Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado.

    Google Scholar 

  • Elliott, D. S., & Tolan, P. (1998). Youth violence prevention, intervention and social policy. In D. J. Flannery & C. R. Huff (Eds.), Youth violence prevention, intervention and social policy (pp. 3–46). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press, Inc.

    Google Scholar 

  • Greenwood, P. (2006). Changing lives: Delinquency prevention as crime-control policy. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Institute of Medicine. (2008). Knowing what works in health care: A roadmap for the nation. Washington, DC: National Academic Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lipsey, M. W., & Derzon, J. H. (1998). Predictors of violent or serious delinquency in adolescence and early adulthood. In R. Loeber & D. P. Farrington (Eds.), Serious and violent juvenile offenders (pp. 86–105). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lipsey, M. W., & Wilson, D. B. (1998). Effective interventions for serious juvenile offenders: A synthesis of research. In R. Loeber & D. P. Farrington (Eds.), Serious and violent juvenile offenders (pp. 313–345). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lipsey, M. W., Landenberger, N. A., Wilson, S. J. (2007). Effects of cognitive-behavioral programs for criminal offenders. Campbell Systematic Reviews, http://www.campbellcollabopration.org. Accessed 2 Apr 2012.

  • Lipsey, M. W., Howell, J. C., Kelly, M. R., Chapman, G., & Carver, D. (2010). Improving the effectiveness of Juvenile Justice Programs. Washington, DC: Center for Juvenile Justice Reform.

    Google Scholar 

  • Loeber, R., Farrington, D. P., & Waschbusch, D. A. (1998). Serious and violent juvenile offenders. In R. Loeber & D. P. Farrington (Eds.), Serious and violent juvenile offenders (pp. 13–29). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

    Google Scholar 

  • Losel, F., & Beelman, A. (2003). Effects of child skills training in preventing antisocial behavior: A systematic review of randomized evaluations. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 587, 84–109.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Mihalic, S., Irwin, K., Elliott, D. S., Fagan, A., Hansen, D. (2001). Blueprints for violence prevention. Juvenile Justice Bulletin (July). Washington, DC: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    Google Scholar 

  • Office of Management and Budget (2002). Presidents Management Agenda. Washington D. C. www.acquistition.gov/sevensteps/library/OMBpres-mgmt-agenda2002.pdf

  • Petrosino, A., Buehler, J., Turpin-Petrosino, C. (2010). Scared straight and other juvenile awareness programs for preventing juvenile delinquency. Campbell Systematic Reviews, http://www.campbellcollabopration.org. Accessed 2 Apr 2012.

  • Shadish, W. R., Jr., Cook, T. D., & Levine, L. C. (1991). Foundations of program evaluation. Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sherman, L. W., Farrington, D. P., Welsh, B. C., & MacKenzie, D. L. (Eds.). (2002). Evidence-based crime prevention. New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Taxman, F., & Belenko, S. (2012). Implementing evidence-based practices in community corrections and addiction treatment. New York: Springer

    Google Scholar 

  • Tolan, P., Bass, A., Henry, D., Schoeny, M. (2008). Mentoring interventions to affect juvenile delinquency and associated problems. Campbell Systematic Reviews, http://www.campbellcollabopration.org. Accessed 4 Apr 2012.

  • US Surgeon General (2001). Youth violence: A report of the Surgeon General. Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office

    Google Scholar 

  • Welsh, B. C., & Farrington, D. P. (Eds.). (2006a). Preventing crime. New York: Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Welsh, B. C., & Farrington, D. P. (2006b). Evidence-based crime prevention. In B. C. Welsh & D. P. Farrington (Eds.), Preventing crime (pp. 1–20). New York: Springer.

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • Wilson, D. B., Gallagher, C. A., & MacKenzie, D. L. (2000). A meta-analysis of corrections-based education, vocation and work programs for adult offenders. Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, 37, 347–368.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Wilson, D. B., Gottfriedson, D. C., & Najaka, S. S. (2001). School-based prevention of problem behaviors: A meta-analysis. Journal of Quantitative Criminology, 17, 247–272.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Wilson, D. B., Mitchell, O., & MacKenzie, D. L. (2006). A systematic review of drug court effects on recidivism. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 2, 459–487.

    Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Delbert S. Elliott .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Elliott, D.S. (2013). Crime Prevention and Intervention Over the Life Course. In: Gibson, C., Krohn, M. (eds) Handbook of Life-Course Criminology. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5113-6_17

Download citation

Publish with us

Policies and ethics