Endovascular Treatment of Symptomatic Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

Chapter

Abstract

The anatomy of a ruptured aortic aneurysm is no different than conventional aortic aneurysms. However, what is key to treating them is the urgency in delineating the anatomy so as to evaluate the suitability for endovascular repair.

Keywords

Permeability Catheter Mold Heparin Flare 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.New York University Medical CenterBronxUSA
  2. 2.New York UniversityNew YorkUSA

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