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Effects of Occlusal Disharmony on Working Memory Performance and Prefrontal Cortex Activity Induced by Working Memory Tasks Measured by NIRS

  • Kaoru Sakatani
  • Takeo Tsujii
  • Teruyasu Hirayama
  • Youichi Katayama
  • Tomotaka Takeda
  • Ai Amemiya
  • Keiichi Ishigami
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 765)

Abstract

The effects of artificial occlusal disharmony (AOD) on working memory function and prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity in the elderly were examined. We evaluated working memory function using the modified Sternberg test (ST). We measured activity in the bilateral PFC during ST using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) before and after AOD: the mandibular position was displaced by a splint for 10 min. AOD caused a gradual increase of oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb) in the bilateral PFC. The response time of ST (six digits) after AOD was longer than that before AOD. The oxy-Hb increase during ST after AOD was smaller than that before AOD. These results indicate that short-term physical stress caused by AOD decreased working memory function in elderly subjects, associated with a decrease of the evoked PFC activity during working memory function.

Keywords

Dementia NIRS Occlusal disharmony Prefrontal cortex Working memory 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was partly supported by Japan Science and Technology Agency, under the Strategic Promotion of Innovative Research and Development Program, and a Grant-in-Aid from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Sciences and Technology of Japan (B23300247).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kaoru Sakatani
    • 1
  • Takeo Tsujii
    • 1
  • Teruyasu Hirayama
    • 2
  • Youichi Katayama
    • 2
  • Tomotaka Takeda
    • 3
  • Ai Amemiya
    • 3
  • Keiichi Ishigami
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Optical Brain EngineeringNihon University School of MedicineItabasi-kuJapan
  2. 2.Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Sports DentistryTokyo Dental CollegeChibaJapan

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