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Concussion in Youth Sports

  • Cynthia J. Stein
  • William P. MeehanIII
Chapter
Part of the Contemporary Pediatric and Adolescent Sports Medicine book series (PASM)

Abstract

Concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury caused by rotational acceleration of the brain following a direct trauma to the head or a force transmitted to the head after injury to the trunk or spine. Concussion results in disturbance of normal brain function, often causing symptoms such headache, dizziness, nausea, and problems with memory, concentration, balance, and sleep. Physical and cognitive rest are the foundations of concussion management, and for most athletes, symptoms resolve within a few days to weeks. Unfortunately, some athletes have prolonged symptoms and may require additional treatments such as physical therapy, medications, and psychological support. There are no proven methods to consistently reduce the risk of concussion. Treatment protocols continue to evolve as our understanding of concussion increases.

Keywords

Concussion Traumatic brain injury Shear strain Cognitive rest Physical rest Sports injury 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Sports MedicineBoston Children’s HospitalBostonUSA
  2. 2.Division of Sports Medicine, Sports Concussion ClinicBoston Children’s HospitalBostonUSA

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