Advertisement

Morphologic Observations on Experimental Atherosclerosis in SEA Japanese Quail

  • M. G. Soret
  • T. Peterson
  • K. P. Chapman
  • W. W. Stafford
  • C. E. Day
  • E. M. Block
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 67)

Abstract

The Japanese quail has been considered useful for the study of experimental atherosclerosis since the original reports of Ojerio et al. (1) and of Smith and Hilker (2). However, in the use of these not selectively bred animals the appearance of gross lesions was not uniform or took up to 28 months for their production. Furthermore, microscopic examination of the lesions was totally or practically neglected.

Keywords

Smooth Muscle Cell Foam Cell Japanese Quail Ground Substance Fatty Streak 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Ojerio, A.D., G.J. Pucak, T.B. Clarkson and B.C. Bullock. 1972. Diet-induced atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction in Japanese quail. Lab. Animal Sci. 22:33–39.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Smith, R.L. and D.M. Hilker. 1973. Experimental dietary production of aortic atherosclerosis in Japanese quail. Atherosclerosis 17:63–70.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Chapman, K.P., W.W. Stafford and C.E. Day. 1976. Animal model for experimental atherosclerosis produced by selective breeding of Japanese quail. In: Atherosclerosis Drug Discovery, ed. by C.E. Day, Plenum Press, New York. pp. 347–356.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    McGill, H.C., Jr. and J.C. Geer. 1963. The human lesion, fine structure. In: Evolution of the Atherosclerotic Plaque, ed. by R.J. Jones, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, pp. 65–76.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Stary, H.C. 1974. Proliferation of arterial cells in atherosclerosis. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 43:59–81.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Still, W.J.S. 1963. An electron microscope study of cholesterol atherosclerosis in the rabbit. Exp. Molec. Path. 2:491–502.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Cooke, P.H. and S.C. Smith. 1968. Smooth muscle cells: The source of foam cells in atherosclerotic White Carneau pigeons Exp. Molec. Path. 8:171–189.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Geer, J.C. and M.D. Haust. 1972. Smooth Muscle Cells in Atherosclerosis. S. Karger, Basel.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Moss, N.S. and E.P. Benditt. 1970. The ultrastructure of spontaneous and experimentally-induced arterial lesions II. The spontaneous plaque in the chicken. Lab. Invest. 23:231–245.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Wissler, R.W. 1967. The arterial muscle cell, smooth muscle or multifunctional mesenchyme? Circulation 36:1–4.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. G. Soret
    • 1
  • T. Peterson
    • 1
  • K. P. Chapman
    • 1
  • W. W. Stafford
    • 1
  • C. E. Day
    • 1
  • E. M. Block
    • 1
  1. 1.The Upjohn CompanyKalamazooUSA

Personalised recommendations