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Reducing Disparities in Sexual Health: Lessons Learned from the Campaign to Eliminate Infectious Syphilis from the United States

  • Jo A. ValentineEmail author
  • Susan J. DeLisle
Chapter

Abstract

All Americans should have equal opportunities to live healthy lives regardless of their income, education, or racial/ethnic background. However, difficult living conditions have made health and wellness elusive for many Americans, creating circumstances that increase poor health outcomes, including disparate rates of sexually transmitted diseases. In particular the persistent high rate of primary and secondary (P&S) syphilis in some of American’s most vulnerable populations has been characterized as a sentinel event, signaling a failure in public health capacity to ensure the health of American communities [1, 2]. The National Campaign to Eliminate Syphilis (SEP), launched in October 1999, was designed to improve public health capacity, and thereby improve infant health, reduce HIV transmission, reduce health care costs, and eliminate a long-standing glaring health disparity.

Keywords

Local Health Department Rapid Response Team Congenital Syphilis Outbreak Response Partner Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of STD PreventionCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Health ConsultantAtlantaUSA

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