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A National Strategic Approach to Improving the Health of Gay and Bisexual Men: Experience in Australia

  • Adrian MindelEmail author
  • Susan Kippax

Abstract

The key to the Australian response to HIV and AIDS was (and continues to be) partnership: a partnership between government, affected communities, public health, and research institutions (biomedical/clinical, epidemiological, and social).

Keywords

Unprotected Anal Intercourse Inject Drug User Casual Partner Affected Community Harm Reduction Strategy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of SydneyCamperdownAustralia
  2. 2.Social Policy Research CentreUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia

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