Case Studies on Food Production, Policy and Trade

  • George Wilson
  • Maarten Ryder
  • Glenn Fitzgerald
  • Michael Tausz
  • Robert Norton
  • Garry O’Leary
  • Saman Seneweera
  • Sabine Tausz-Posch
  • Mahabubur Mollah
  • Jo Luck
  • Grant Hollaway
Chapter

Abstract

Few native animals, other than fish and crustaceans, are used in food production by the humans who recently arrived in Australia. Even Aboriginal Australians have now become reliant on introduced species which evolved elsewhere. In part, this is due to cultural dominance, first of the British and then other western perspectives in last 200 years. It is also because introduced species generally have higher production rates following centuries of agricultural selection and recently, energy-intensive farming practices. But it need not always be that exotic species are superior, particularly in the context of climate change. Replacing cattle and sheep on the rangelands with well-adapted species such as kangaroos and making greater use of them just as Aborigines did for 40,000 years, is a prospect worthy of further investigation.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • George Wilson
    • 1
  • Maarten Ryder
    • 2
  • Glenn Fitzgerald
    • 3
  • Michael Tausz
    • 4
  • Robert Norton
    • 5
  • Garry O’Leary
    • 3
  • Saman Seneweera
    • 4
  • Sabine Tausz-Posch
    • 4
  • Mahabubur Mollah
    • 3
  • Jo Luck
    • 6
  • Grant Hollaway
    • 3
  1. 1.Australian National UniversityCanberraAustralia
  2. 2.University of AdelaideAdelaideAustralia
  3. 3.Department of Primary IndustriesMelbourneAustralia
  4. 4.University of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  5. 5.International Plant Nutrition Institute, IPNIHorshamAustralia
  6. 6.Plant Biosecurity Cooperative Research CentreCanberraAustralia

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