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The Criterion of Concreteness: Seven Psychological Orphans in Search of a Theory—Toward a Neo-Behaviorist View

  • Luciano L’Abate
Chapter

Abstract

In previous chapters of this monograph, the two professional requirements of specificity and concreteness were introduced that go beyond established scientific criteria of reliability and validity. The requirement of specificity was expanded in Chap. 4 of this volume. The purpose of this chapter is to introduce the second requirement of concreteness necessary to perform clinical psychology and psychotherapy practices as a professional science. To achieve this goal, this chapter will critically review several seemingly important psychological constructs developed and validated independently of a theory from the viewpoint of this second requirement in clinical psychology and psychotherapy: concreteness.

Keywords

Personality Disorder Positive Psychology Multidimensional Construct Relational Competence Hurt Feeling 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luciano L’Abate
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyGeorgia State UniversityAtlantaUSA

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