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Beyond Reliability and Validity: Toward Specificity in Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy

  • Luciano L’Abate
Chapter

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to argue that the status of clinical psychology and psychotherapy is chaotic on many grounds. Many clinical psychologists and psychotherapists practice with little regard to theory as a guide to practice or to research as an evaluative link to interventions. Instead many clinical psychologists and psychotherapists base their interventions on the by-now-outdated 1on1, f2f, tb paradigm using intuitive and creative, nonreplicable improvisations that result in various Towers of Babel in evaluation, practice, research, and theory. In addition to reliability and validity, clinical psychologists and psychotherapists will need to follow a requirement of specificity, as shown in Fig. 2.1 of this volume.

Keywords

Generalize Anxiety Disorder Beck Depression Inventory Panic Disorder Clinical Psychologist Test Instrument 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luciano L’Abate
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyGeorgia State UniversityAtlantaUSA

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