IQ Testing and the Hispanic Client

Chapter

Abstract

Intellectual assessment remains a routine part of the psychodiagnostic and neuropsychological evaluation. Since their inception, IQ tests have been scrutinized for their cross-cultural generalizability, including with Hispanic populations. This is a critical issue as it has become increasingly apparent that IQ scores are highly susceptible to environmental influences, including years of education and socioeconomic status. Furthermore, IQ scores have been found to be heavily influenced by acculturation and language proficiency. These issues are particularly pertinent for Hispanic clients, who are often first- or second-generation immigrants who speak English as a second language. This chapter reviews and discusses the limitations of current IQ tests as they apply to Hispanic populations and provides general guidelines for clinicians when they administer these tests to Hispanic clients. Some recently published IQ tests show greater cross-cultural applicability for Hispanics as they are either less reliant on verbal ability or were normed and standardized for Spanish-speaking populations. Recommendations for these and other IQ tests are provided.

Keywords

Dementia Income Posit 

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of NevadaLas VegasUSA

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