Speech-Generating Devices for Communication and Social Development

  • Giulio E. Lancioni
  • Jeff Sigafoos
  • Mark F. O’Reilly
  • Nirbhay N. Singh
Chapter
Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of studies on using speech-generating devices (SGDs) to improve the communication and social functioning of persons with severe/profound and multiple disabilities. The studies are divided into four groups based on the pragmatic function of the communication responses targeted for improvement. The first group concerns studies that targeted the requesting function. The second group concerns studies on teaching communicative rejecting. The third group consists of studies on developing more socially oriented forms of communication, such as recruiting social interaction and/or initiating conversation. The fourth group includes studies aimed at reducing problem behaviors by teaching functional use of SGDs. The final part of this chapter analyzes the outcomes of the studies reviewed, considers the implications of these findings for overall communication and social development, and highlights directions for future research.

Keywords

Sponge Straw Tray Blindness Shoe 

References

  1. Adamson, L. B., Romski, M. A., Deffebach, K., & Sevcik, R. A. (1992). Symbol vocabulary and the focus of conversations: Augmenting language development for youth with mental retardation. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 35, 1333–1343.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Banda, D. R., Copple, K. S., Koul, R. K., Sancibrian, S. L., & Bogschutz, R. J. (2010). Video modelling interventions to teach spontaneous requesting using AAC devices to individuals with autism: A preliminary investigation. Disability and Rehabilitation, 32, 1364–1372.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Beck, A. R., Stoner, J. B., & Dennis, M. (2009). An investigation of aided language stimulation: Does it increase AAC use with adults with developmental disabilities and complex communication needs? Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 25, 42–54.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Bellon-Harn, M. L., & Harn, W. E. (2008). Scaffolding strategies during repeated storybook reading: An extension using a voice output communication aid. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 23, 112–124.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Blischak, D. M., & Lloyd, L. L. (1996). Multi-modal augmentative and alternative communication: Case study. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 12, 37–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Blischak, D. M., Lombardino, L. J., & Dyson, A. T. (2003). Use of speech-generating devices: In support of natural speech. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 19, 29–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Brady, N. C. (2000). Improved comprehension of object names following voice output communication aid use: Two case studies. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 16, 197–204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Brady, N. C., & Halle, J. W. (2002). Breakdowns and repairs in conversation between beginning AAC users and their partners. In J. Reichle, D. R. Beukelman, & J. C. Light (Eds.), Exemplary practices for beginning communicators: Implications for AAC (pp. 323–351). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.Google Scholar
  9. Buzolich, M. J., King, J. S., & Baroody, S. M. (1991). Acquisition of the commenting function among system users. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 7, 88–99.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Choi, H., O’Reilly, M., Sigafoos, J., & Lancioni, G. (2010). Teaching requesting and rejecting sequences to four children with developmental disabilities using augmentative and alternative communication. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 31, 560–567.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Cosby, J. E., & Johnston, S. (2006). Using a single-switch voice output communication aid to increase social access for children with severe disabilities in inclusive classrooms. Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities, 31, 144–156.Google Scholar
  12. Dattilo, J., & Camarata, S. (1991). Facilitating conversation through self-initiated augmentative communication treatment. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 24, 369–378.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Duker, P., Didden, R., & Sigafoos, J. (2004). One-to-one training: Instructional procedures for learners with developmental disabilities. Austin: Pro-Ed.Google Scholar
  14. Durand, V. M. (1990). Severe behavior problems: A functional communication training approach. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  15. Durand, V. M. (1993). Functional communication training using assistive devices: Effects on challenging behavior and affect. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 9, 168–176.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Durand, V. M. (1999). Functional communication training using assistive devices: Recruiting natural communities of reinforcement. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 32, 247–267.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Dyches, T. T. (1998). Effects of switch training on the communication of children with autism and severe disabilities. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 13, 151–162.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Dyches, T. T., Davis, A., Lucido, B. R., & Young, J. R. (2002). Generalization of skills using pictographic and voice output communication devices. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 18, 124–131.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Franco, J. H., Lang, R. L., O’Reilly, M. F., Chan, J. M., Sigafoos, J., & Rispoli, M. (2009). Functional analysis and treatment of inappropriate vocalizations using a speech-generating device for a child with autism. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 24, 146–155.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Gee, K., Graham, N., Goetz, L., Oshima, G., & Yoshioka, K. (1991). Teaching students to request the continuation of routine activities by using time delay and decreasing physical assistance in the context of chain interruption. Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps, 16, 154–167.Google Scholar
  21. Green, V. A., & Sigafoos, J. (2007). Overview. In J. Sigafoos & V. A. Green (Eds.), Teaching and technology (pp. 1–6). New York: Nova.Google Scholar
  22. Healy, S. (1994). The use of synthetic speech output communication aid by a youth with severe developmental disability. In K. Linfoot (Ed.), Communication strategies for people with developmental disabilities: Issues from theory and practice (pp. 156–176). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.Google Scholar
  23. Hemsley, B., Sigafoos, J., Balandin, S., Forbes, R., Taylor, C., Green, V. A., & Parmenter, T. (2001). Nursing the patient with severe communication impairment. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 35, 827–835.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Kagohara, D. M., van der Meer, L., Achmadi, D., Green, V. A., O’Reilly, M. F., Mulloy, A., Lancioni, G. E., Lang, R., & Sigafoos, J. (2010). Behavioral intervention promotes successful use of an iPod-based communication device by an adolescent with autism. Clinical Case Studies, 9, 328–338.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Kennedy, C. H. (2005). Single-case designs for educational research. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.Google Scholar
  26. Koppenhaver, D. A., Erickson, K. A., Harris, B., McLellan, J., Skotko, B. G., & Newton, R. A. (2001). Storybook-based communication intervention for girls with Rett syndrome and their mothers. Disability and Rehabilitation, 23, 149–159.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Kozleski, E. B. (1991). Expectant delay procedure for teaching requests. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 7, 11–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Lancioni, G. E., O’Reilly, M. F., Oliva, D., & Coppa, M. M. (2001). Using multiple microswitches to promote different responses in children with multiple disabilities. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 22, 309–318.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Lancioni, G. E., Singh, N. N., O’Reilly, M. F., Sigafoos, J., Oliva, D., & Baccani, S. (2006). Teaching “yes” and “no” responses to children with multiple disabilities through a program including microswitches linked to a vocal output device. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 102, 51–61.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Lancioni, G. E., O’Reilly, M. F., Singh, N. N., Sigafoos, J., Oliva, D., & Severini, L. (2008a). Three persons with multiple disabilities accessing environmental stimuli and asking for social contact through microswitch and VOCA technology. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 52, 327–336.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Lancioni, G. E., O’Reilly, M. F., Singh, N. N., Sigafoos, J., Oliva, D., & Severini, L. (2008b). Enabling two persons with multiple disabilities to access environmental stimuli and ask for social contact through microswitches and a VOCA. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 29, 21–28.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Lancioni, G. E., O’Reilly, M. F., Singh, N. N., Sigafoos, J., Didden, R., Oliva, D., Campodonico, F., de Pace, C., Chiapparino, C., & Groeneweg, J. (2009a). Persons with multiple disabilities accessing stimulation and requesting social contact via microswitch and VOCA devices: New research evaluation and social validation. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 30, 1084–1094.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Lancioni, G. E., O’Reilly, M. F., Singh, N. N., Sigafoos, J., Oliva, D., Smaldone, A., La Martire, M. L., Antonucci, M., De Pace, C., & Chiapparino, C. (2009b). Persons with multiple disabilities access stimulation and contact the caregiver via microswitch and VOCA technology. Life Span and Disability, XII, 119–128.Google Scholar
  34. Lancioni, G. E., Singh, N. N., O’Reilly, M. F., Sigafoos, J., Buonocunto, F., Sacco, V., Colonna, F., Navarro, J., Oliva, D., Signorino, M., & Megna, G. (2009c). Microswitch- and VOCA-assisted programs for two post-coma persons with minimally conscious state and pervasive motor disabilities. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 30, 1459–1467.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Locke, P. A., & Mirenda, P. (1988). A computer-supported communication approach for a child with severe communication, visual, and cognitive impairments: A case study. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 4, 15–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Matas, J., Mathy-Laikko, P., Beukelman, D., & Legresley, K. (1985). Identifying the nonspeaking population: A demographic study. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 1, 17–31.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Mathy-Laikko, P., Iacono, T., Ratcliff, A., Villarruel, F., Yoder, D., & Vanderheiden, G. (1989). Teaching a child with multiple disabilities to use a tactile augmentative communication device. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 5, 249–256.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Mayer-Johnson Co. (1994). Picture communication symbols combination book. Solano Beach, CA: Mayer-Johnson Co.Google Scholar
  39. McGregor, G., Yopung, J., Gerak, J., Thomas, B., & Vogelsberg, R. (1992). Increasing functional use of an assistive communication device by a student with severe disabilities. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 8, 243–250.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Mechling, L. C., & Cronin, B. (2006). Computer-based video instruction to teach the use of augmentative and alternative communication devices for ordering at fast-food restaurants. Journal of Special Education, 39, 234–245.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Mirenda, P. (2009). Promising interventions in AAC for individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 18, 112–113.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Mullennix, J., & Stern, S. (Eds.). (2010). Computer synthesized speech technologies: Tools for aiding impairment. Hershey: Medical Information Science Reference.Google Scholar
  43. O’Keefe, B. M., & Dattilo, J. (1992). Teaching the response-recode form to adults with mental retardation using AAC systems. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 8, 224–233.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Olive, M., Lang, R., & Davis, T. (2008). An analysis of the effects of functional communication training and a voice output communication aid for a child with autism spectrum disorder. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2, 223–236.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Reichle, J., York, J., & Sigafoos, J. (1991). Implementing augmentative and alternative communication: Strategies for learners with severe disabilities. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.Google Scholar
  46. Rispoli, M. J., Franco, J. H., van der Meer, L., Lang, R., & Hoher Camargo, S. P. (2010). The use of speech generating devices in communication interventions for individuals with developmental disabilities: A review of the literature. Developmental Neurorehabilitation, 13, 276–293.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Romski, M. A., & Sevcik, R. A. (1993). Language comprehension: Considerations for augmentative and alternative communication. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 9, 281–285.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Romski, M. A., & Sevcik, R. A. (1996). Breaking the speech barrier: Language development through augmented means. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.Google Scholar
  49. Romski, M. A., Sevcik, R. A., & Pate, J. L. (1988). Establishment of symbolic communication in persons with severe retardation. The Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 53, 94–107.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  50. Russell, T., & Beard, L. (1992). Computer assisted speech as an alternative communication system for the severely multiply handicapped. The Baylor Educator, 17, 43–50.Google Scholar
  51. Schepis, M. M., & Reid, D. H. (1995). Effects of a voice output communication on interactions between support personnel and an individual with multiple disabilities. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 28, 73–77.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Schepis, M. M., Reid, D. H., & Behrman, M. M. (1996). Acquisition and functional use of voice output communication by persons with profound multiple disabilities. Behavior Modification, 20, 451–468.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Schepis, M. M., Reid, D. H., Behrman, M. M., & Sutton, K. A. (1998). Increasing communicative interactions of young children with autism using a voice output communication aid and naturalistic teaching. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 31, 561–578.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Schlosser, R. W., & Blischak, D. M. (2001). Is there a role for speech output in interventions for persons with autism? A review. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 16, 170–178.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Schlosser, R. W., Sigafoos, J., & Koul, R. K. (2009). Speech output and speech-generating devices in autism spectrum disorders. In P. Mirenda & T. Iacono (Eds.), Autism spectrum disorders and AAC (pp. 141–169). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.Google Scholar
  56. Schweigert, P. (1989). Use of microswitch technology to facilitate social contingency awareness as a basis for early communication skills. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 5, 192–198.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. Sigafoos, J., & Drasgow, E. (2001). Conditional use of aided and unaided AAC: A review and clinical case demonstration. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 16, 152–161.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. Sigafoos, J., & Iacono, T. (1993). Selecting augmentative communication devices for persons with severe disabilities: Some factors for educational teams to consider. Australia and New Zealand Journal of Developmental Disabilities, 18, 133–146.Google Scholar
  59. Sigafoos, J., & Roberts-Pennell, D. (1999). Wrong-item format: A promising intervention for teaching socially appropriate forms of rejecting to children with developmental disabilities? Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 15, 135–140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  60. Sigafoos, J., Pennell, D., & Versluis, J. (1996). Naturalistic assessment leading to effective treatment of self-injury in a young boy with multiple disabilities. Educational and Treatment of Children, 19, 101–123.Google Scholar
  61. Sigafoos, J., O’Reilly, M. F., Drasgow, E., & Reichle, J. (2002). Strategies to achieve socially acceptable escape and avoidance. In J. Reichle, D. R. Beukelman, & J. C. Light (Eds.), Exemplary practices for beginning communicators: Implications for AAC (pp. 157–186). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.Google Scholar
  62. Sigafoos, J., Drasgow, E., Halle, J. W., O’Reilly, M. F., Seely-York, S., Edrisinha, C., & Andrews, A. (2004a). Teaching VOCA use as a communicative repair strategy. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 34, 411–422.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. Sigafoos, J., Drasgow, E., Reichle, J., O’Reilly, M., Green, V. A., & Tait, K. (2004b). Tutorial: Teaching communicative rejecting to children with severe disabilities. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 13, 31–42.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. Sigafoos, J., O’Reilly, M. F., Seely-York, S., Weru, J., Son, S., Green, V. A., & Lancioni, G. E. (2004c). Transferring AAC intervention to the home. Disability and Rehabilitation, 26, 1330–1334.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. Sigafoos, J., O’Reilly, M. F., Ganz, J. B., Lancioni, G. E., & Schlosser, R. W. (2005). Supporting self-determination in AAC interventions by assessing preference for communication devices. Technology and Disability, 17, 143–153.Google Scholar
  66. Sigafoos, J., Ganz, J., O’Reilly, M., & Lancioni, G. (2008). Evidence-based practice in the classroom: Evaluating a procedure for reducing perseverative requesting in an adolescent with autism and severe intellectual disability. Australasian Journal of Special Education, 32, 55–65.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. Sigafoos, J., O’Reilly, M. F., & Lancioni, G. E. (2009). Functional communication training and choice-making interventions for the treatment of problem behavior in individuals with autism spectrum disorders. In P. Mirenda & T. Iacono (Eds.), Autism spectrum disorders and AAC (pp. 333–353). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.Google Scholar
  68. Sigafoos, J., Arthur-Kelly, M., & Butterfield, N. (2006). Enhancing everyday communication in children with disabilities. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.Google Scholar
  69. Sigafoos, J., Wermink, H., Didden, R., Green, V. A., Schlosser, R. W., O’Reilly, M. F., & Lancioni, G. E. (2011). Effects of varying lengths of synthetic speech output on augmented requesting and natural speech production in an adolescent with Klinefelter syndrome. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 27, 163–171.Google Scholar
  70. Snell, M. E., & Brown, F. (2006). Instruction of students with severe disabilities (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River: Pearson.Google Scholar
  71. Sobsey, D., & Reichle, J. (1989). Components of reinforcement for attention signal switch activation. Mental Retardation and Learning Disabilities Bulletin, 17, 46–59.Google Scholar
  72. Soto, G., Belfiore, P. J., Schlosser, R. W., & Haynes, C. (1993). Teaching specific requests: A comparative analysis of skill acquisition and preference using two augmentative and alternative communication aids. Education and Training in Mental Retardation, 28, 169–178.Google Scholar
  73. Spiegel, B. B., Benjamin, B. J., & Spiegel, S. A. (1993). One method to increase spontaneous use of an assistive communication device: Case study. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 9, 111–118.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. Sutherland, D., Sigafoos, J., Schlosser, R. W., O’Reilly, M. F., & Lancioni, G. E. (2010). Are speech-generating devices viable AAC options for adults with intellectual disabilities? In J. Mullennix & S. Stern (Eds.), Computer synthesized speech technologies: Tools for aiding impairment (pp. 161–176). Hershey: Medical Information Science Reference.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. Thunberg, G., Ahlsen, E., & Sandberg, A. (2009a). Interaction and use of speech-generating devices in the homes of children with autism spectrum disorders – An analysis of conversational topics. Journal of Special Education Technology, 24, 1–17.Google Scholar
  76. Thunberg, G., Sandberg, A., & Ahlsen, E. (2009b). Speech-generating devices used at home by children with autism spectrum disorders: A preliminary assessment. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 24, 104–115.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  77. Trembath, D., Balandin, S., Togher, L., & Stancliffe, R. J. (2009). Peer-mediate teaching and augmentative and alternative communication for preschool-aged children with autism. Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 34, 173–186.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. Trottier, N., Kamp, L., & Mirenda, P. (2011). Effects of peer-mediated instruction to teach use of speech-generating devices to students with autism in social games routines. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 27, 26–39.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  79. Van Acker, R., & Grant, S. H. (1995). An effective computer-based requesting system for persons with Rett syndrome. Journal of Childhood Communication Disorders, 16, 31–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  80. van der Meer, L., & Rispoli, M. J. (2010). Communication interventions involving speech-generating devices for children with autism: A review of the literature. Developmental Neurorehabilitation, 13, 294–306.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  81. van der Meer, L., Sigafoos, J., O’Reilly, M. F., & Lancioni, G. E. (2011a). Assessing preferences for AAC options in communication interventions for individuals with developmental disabilities: A review of the literature. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 32, 1422–1431.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  82. van der Meer, L., Kagohara, D., Achmadi, D., Green, V. A., Herrington, C., Sigafoos, J., et al. (2011b). Teaching functional use of an iPodbased speech-generating device to individuals with developmental disabilities. Journal of Special Education Technology, 26, 1–11.Google Scholar
  83. Wacker, D. P., Wiggins, B., Fowler, M., & Berg, W. K. (1988). Training students with profound or multiple handicaps to make requests via microswitches. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 21, 331–343.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  84. White, A. R., Carney, E., & Reichle, J. (2010). Group-item and directed scanning: Examining preschoolers’ accuracy and efficiency in two augmentative communication symbol selection methods. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 19, 311–320.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Giulio E. Lancioni
    • 1
  • Jeff Sigafoos
    • 2
  • Mark F. O’Reilly
    • 3
  • Nirbhay N. Singh
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Neuroscience and Sense OrgansUniversity of BariBariItaly
  2. 2.School of Educational Psychology & PedagogyVictoria University of WellingtonWellingtonNew Zealand
  3. 3.Department of Special EducationUniversity of Texas at Austin The Meadows Center for Preventing Educational RiskAustinUSA
  4. 4.American Health and Wellness InstituteRaleighUSA

Personalised recommendations