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Alternative Therapies in Dementia

  • Anne M. Lipton
  • Cindy D. Marshall
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, we discuss nutritional and other nonmedication approaches to dementia. Whether such strategies prevent cognitive impairment in people without preexisting dementia is a worthy topic and we touch on it, but an extensive discussion of therapies for prevention of cognitive impairment in healthy individuals is beyond the scope of this book and chapter. Our discussion instead focuses mainly on patients who already have dementia.

Keywords

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Mild Cognitive Impairment Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Stem Cell Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne M. Lipton
    • 1
  • Cindy D. Marshall
    • 2
  1. 1.Diplomate in NeurologyAmerican Board of Psychiatry and NeurologyBuffalo GroveUSA
  2. 2.Memory Center, Baylor Neuroscience CenterBaylor University Medical CenterDallasUSA

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