Production of Radionuclides

Chapter

Abstract

Currently more than 3700 nuclides are known, of which nearly 3420 are radioactive, and the rest are stable. The majority of radionuclides are artificially produced in the cyclotron and reactor. Some short-lived radionuclides are available from the so-called radionuclide generators in which a long-lived parent radionuclide are loaded and decay to a short-lived daughter radionuclide. The following is a brief description of the sources of different radionuclides.

Keywords

Graphite Cadmium Transportation Uranium Vanadium 

Suggested Readings

  1. Colombetti LG. Radionuclide generators. In: Rayudu GVS, ed. Radiotracers for Medical Applications. Boca Raton, Fla: CRC Press; 1983;II:133–168.Google Scholar
  2. Friedlander G, Kennedy JW, Macias ES, Miller JM. Nuclear and Radiochemistry. 3rd ed. New York: Wiley; 1981.Google Scholar
  3. Gelbard AS, Hara T, Tilbury RS, Laughlin JS. Recent aspects of cyclotron production of medically useful radionuclides. In: Radiopharmaceuticals and Labelled Compounds. Vienna: IAEA; 1973:239–247.Google Scholar
  4. Mirzadeh S, Mausner LF, Garland MA. Reactor-produced medical radionuclides. In: Vértes A, Nagy S, Klencsár Z, eds. Handbook of Nuclear Chemistry. Vol 4, Dordrecht: Kluwer; 2003.Google Scholar
  5. Noronha OPD, Sewatkar AB, Ganatra RD, et al. Fission-produced 99Mo–99mTc generator system for medical use. J Nucl Med Biol. 1976;20:32–36.Google Scholar
  6. Poggenburg JK. The nuclear reactor and its products. SeminNucl Med. 1974;4:229–243.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Quaim SM. Cyclotron production of medical radionuclides. In: Vértes A, Nagy S, Klencsár Z, eds. Handbook of Nuclear Chemistry. Vol 4, Dordrecht: Kluwer; 2003.Google Scholar
  8. Saha GB. Miscellaneous tracers for imaging. In: Rayudu GVS, ed. Radiotracers for Medical Applications. Boca Raton, Fla: CRC Press; 1983; II:119–132.Google Scholar
  9. Saha GB. Fundamentals of Nuclear Pharmacy. 6th ed. New York: Springer; 2010.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Saha GB. Basics of PET Imaging.2nd ed. New York: Springer; 2010.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Saha GB, MacIntyre WJ, Go RT. Cyclotron and positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals for clinical imaging. Semin Nucl Med. 1992;22:150–161.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Scholten B, Lambrecht RM, Cogneau et al. Excitation functions for the cyclotron production of 99mTc and 99Mo. Appl Radiat Isotopes 1999;51:69.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Cleveland Clinic FoundationEmeritus StaffClevelandUSA

Personalised recommendations