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Family Life Education: Issues and Challenges in Professional Practice

  • Charles B. Hennon
  • M. Elise Radina
  • Stephan M. Wilson

Abstract

This chapter reviews the field of family life education (FLE). This review begins with a historical overview of FLE as a field of study and an area of professional practice, with specific focus on the issues and challenges faced by family life educators and others in defining the scope, content, and goals of the field. Professionalization of the field is reviewed. Two major aspects of importance for ethical and appropriate professional practice are then discussed: (1) the role of family life educators’ philosophies of education in influencing programmatic efforts, and (2) approaches to curriculum development. The chapter concludes with a summary of areas of challenge for the field of FLE where continuing efforts for developing the field should focus.

Keywords

Family Life Family Therapy Cultural Competency Curriculum Development Service Delivery Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York  2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles B. Hennon
    • 1
  • M. Elise Radina
    • 2
  • Stephan M. Wilson
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Family Studies and Social Work, Center for Human Development, Learning, and TechnologyMiami UniversityOxfordUSA
  2. 2.Department of Family Studies and Social WorkMiami UniversityOxfordUSA
  3. 3.Department of Human Development and Family Science, College of Human SciencesOklahoma State UniversityStillwaterUSA

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