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Embodied Therapy for Clients Expressing Gender Variation: Using Creative Movement to Explore and Express Body Image Concerns

Chapter

Abstract

Although the terms gender and sex are often used interchangeably, they are different concepts. The term sex is used to refer to the biological indicators that are associated with male or female sex designation, such as genitals and the XX or XY chromosome patterns. The term gender refers to the social presentation of identity that is associated or attributed to the biological indicators of sex. Gender presentation includes clothing choice, first names, and cultural roles associated with men and women.

Keywords

Body Image Gender Identity Therapy Session Interpersonal Support Expressive Movement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.BaltimoreUSA

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