Psycho-Social Aspects/Parent Support Groups

Chapter

Abstract

To have a child diagnosed with cancer is one of the most life-altering experiences that a family will ever need to face. Childhood cancer parent groups and foundations have been formed throughout the world to help families through this unwelcome journey.

Despite the fact that the burden of childhood cancer is not recognized in many countries, the impact of the disease on the family, community, and economy is devastating.

In developing countries most children present late with advanced disease. The chances of a successful outcome are severely compromised by this as well as other factors such as access to care, lack of transport, financial burdens, cultural beliefs, etc. In this context the presence of childhood cancer support organizations, parent groups, and childhood cancer foundations is essential in the fight against cancer.

Keywords

Depression Income 

References

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Suggested Reading

  1. Childhood Cancer Foundation of South Africa (“CHOC”). CHOC’s guide for parents [Internet]. 2006. Available from: http://www.choc.org.za/pdf/parent_handbook.pdf
  2. The Executive Committee of ICCCPO (The International Confederation of Childhood Cancer Parent Organizations). Your Group is Not Alone [Internet]. 2008. Available from: http://cms.onlinebase.nl/userfiles/c1icccpo/file/Handbook_FINAL.pdf
  3. World Health Organization (WHO). Cancer pain relief and palliative care in children. Geneva: WHO; 1998.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth Dollman
    • 1
  • Wondu Bekele
    • 2
  • Kazuyo Watanabe
    • 3
  1. 1.The International Confederation of Childhood Cancer Parent OrganizationsCHOC Childhood Cancer Foundation South AfricaDurbanvilleSouth Africa
  2. 2.Mathiwos Wondu-YeEthiopia Cancer SocietyAddis AbabaEthiopia
  3. 3.Asian Children’s Care League-Japan (ACCL)TokyoJapan

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