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The Future of Children Today

Abstract

How do we go about predicting the future of children today? What statistics should be examined? What outcomes should be measured? What formulas computed? There are no definitive or precise answers. In the second edition volume, we have attempted to expand upon and address these issues through the study and clinical application of resilience and resilience processes. We have sought to address which variables and through which processes within the child, immediate family, and extended community interact to offset the negative effects of adversity, thereby increasing the probability of our survival. Some of these processes may serve to protect the negative effects of specific stressors while others simply act to enhance development. In the truest sense, the study of resilience as an outcome phenomenon gathers knowledge that hopefully can be used to shape and change the future for the better.

Keywords

  • Psychological Control
  • Depressed Mother
  • Resource Factor
  • Child Relationship Quality
  • Maternal Warmth

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Sam Goldstein .

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Goldstein, S., Brooks, R.B. (2013). The Future of Children Today. In: Goldstein, S., Brooks, R. (eds) Handbook of Resilience in Children. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-3661-4_29

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