Preliminary Survey Regarding Yersiniosis in Ireland

  • Tamara Ringwood
  • Brenda P. Murphy
  • Niall Drummond
  • James F. Buckley
  • Séamus Fanning
  • Michael B. Prentice
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 954)

Abstract

Yersiniosis associated with abdominal pain presenting to surgeons was commonly reported in Ireland in the 1980s. However, the National Health Protection Surveillance Centre currently records only 3–7 cases of yersiniosis per year. To establish the current prevalence of yersiniosis causing diarrhoea in humans in Ireland, we carried out a preliminary prospective culture study of faeces samples from patients with diarrhoea, and serological screening of Irish blood donors.

Keywords

Agar Doyle 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This project was funded by the Irish Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (DAFF) and the Food Institute Research Measure (FIRM) [grant no.: 06/R&D/D419]. This study was approved by the Cork Regional Ethics Committee (CREC).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tamara Ringwood
    • 1
  • Brenda P. Murphy
    • 2
    • 3
  • Niall Drummond
    • 3
  • James F. Buckley
    • 2
  • Séamus Fanning
    • 3
  • Michael B. Prentice
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity College CorkCorkIreland
  2. 2.Veterinary DepartmentCork County CouncilCorkIreland
  3. 3.UCD Centre for Food Safety, School of Public Health, Physiotherapy & Population ScienceUniversity College DublinDublin 4Ireland

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