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Conclusion: The Essence of Peace? Toward a Comprehensive and Parsimonious Model of Sustainable Peace

Part of the Peace Psychology Book Series book series (PPBS)

Abstract

The excellent chapters in this book offer a vast array of psychosocial conditions and processes which have been linked to sustainable peace. This concluding chapter offers a summary and synthesis of this research; highlighting the basic commonalities of the construct of sustainable peace that underlay the many aspects discussed in the book, and offering a more parsimonious model of sustainable peace, informed by dynamical systems theory, which conceptualizes the effects of the many component parts on increasing and decreasing the probabilities of stable dynamics of destructive conflict and peace.

Keywords

  • International Criminal Court
  • Latent Attractor
  • Peace Education
  • Constructive Conflict
  • Negative Attractor

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Peter T. Coleman Ph.D. .

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Coleman, P.T. (2012). Conclusion: The Essence of Peace? Toward a Comprehensive and Parsimonious Model of Sustainable Peace. In: Coleman, P. (eds) Psychological Components of Sustainable Peace. Peace Psychology Book Series. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-3555-6_18

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