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Mercury Pollution in Malaysia

  • Parvaneh Hajeb
  • Jinap S. 
  • Ahmad Ismail
  • Nor Ainy Mahyudin
Chapter
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 220)

Abstract

Mercury is a hazardous pollutant; concern for its environmental presence arises from the human health effects caused by methylmercury through consumption of fresh water and marine fish (Clarkson 1995). Researchers first became concerned about the harmful effects of mercury when anthropogenic sources were released into the marine environment, and caused poisoning episodes (e.g., neurological disorders) in Japan (Minamata and Niigata) (Keckes and Miettinen 1972). This first known human poisoning by mercury from ingestion of seafood occurred in Japan between 1953 and 1961. During that period, more than 100 people were affected by eating shellfish, crabs, and fish from Minamata Bay, Kyushu, Japan. The victims developed many serious neurological disturbances, and severe cases produced stupor, coma, exhibiting involuntary movements, tremors, agitation, and convulsions (Deocadiz et al. 1999).

Keywords

Municipal Solid Waste Mercury Concentration Hair Sample Total Mercury Mercury Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Parvaneh Hajeb
    • 1
  • Jinap S. 
    • 1
  • Ahmad Ismail
    • 2
  • Nor Ainy Mahyudin
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Food Science and Technology, Centre of Excellence for Food Safety Research (CEFSR)Universiti Putra MalaysiaSerdangMalaysia
  2. 2.Department of Biology, Faculty of ScienceUniversiti Putra MalaysiaSerdangMalaysia

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