Empirical Status of One-Session Treatment

  • Thompson. E. Davis III
  • Whitney S. Jenkins
  • Brittany M. Rudy
Chapter
Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

One-session treatment (OST) is a massed, intensive exposure treatment that is maximized to a single 3-hour session. OST uniquely incorporates a variety of efficacious methods such as participant modeling, reinforcement, psychoeducation, and cognitive challenges during graduated exposure (Davis and Ollendick, Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice 12:144–160, 2005; Davis et al., Cognitive and Behavioral Practice 16:294–303, 2009; Öst, Phobias: A handbook of theory, research, and treatment, pp. 227–247, 1997; Zlomke and Davis, Behavior Therapy 39:207–223, 2008). To address these points, various other chapters have covered the implementation of OST (see Chaps. 4–7 and 9) using the extant literature to describe the principles and administration of OST with a variety of different individuals. This chapter, however, will examine the literature to determine the evidence base behind the use of OST, and its current evidentiary standing will be evaluated and updated (see Davis et al., Clinical Psychology Review 31:592–602, 2011; Davis and Ollendick, Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice 12:144–160, 2005; and Zlomke and Davis, Behavior Therapy 39:207–223, 2008 for previous reviews). The most detailed review of OST to date, by Zlomke and Davis (Behavior Therapy 39:207–223, 2008), summarized the literature and concluded that approximately 85–90% of individuals receiving OST benefited significantly from the treatment and that it met empirically supported treatment criteria for a probably efficacious intervention at that time. In the years since Zlomke and Davis, however, a number of other studies have added to the evidence base for OST making a new, updated review timely.

Keywords

Placebo Depression 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thompson. E. Davis III
    • 1
  • Whitney S. Jenkins
    • 2
  • Brittany M. Rudy
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyLouisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA
  2. 2.Laboratory for Anxiety, Phobia, & Internalizing Disorder Studies (LAPIS), Department of PsychologyLouisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA

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