Advertisement

Industry and Firm Studies

  • Victor J. Tremblay
  • Carol Horton Tremblay
Chapter
Part of the Springer Texts in Business and Economics book series (STBE)

Abstract

In this chapter we use case studies to identify patterns of behavior that highlight what we have learned from studying industrial organization. We begin with an investigation of three US industries: brewing, cigarettes, and college sports. Rather than provide a comprehensive study of them, we focus on the most important forces that have shaped each industry and/or have influenced public policy. This will allow us to show how industrial organization theory is relevant and can help us understand reality.

Keywords

General Motor National Collegiate Athletic Association College Football Internet Explorer College Sport 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Aaker DA (1991) Managing brand equity: capitalizing on the value of a name brand. Free Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  2. Adams WJ (2006) Beer in Germany and the United States. J Econ Perspect 20(1):185–202CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Adams WJ (2011) Determinants of the concentration in Beer markets in Germany and the United States: 1950–2005. In: Swinnen JFM (ed) The economics of Beer. Oxford University Press, New York, pp 227–246CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Bittlingmayer G, Hazlett TW (2000) DOS Kapital: has antitrust action against microsoft created value in the computer industry? J Fin Econ 55:329–357CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Blaxill M, Eckardt R (2009) The invisible edge: taking your strategy to the next level using intellectual property, Portfolio PressGoogle Scholar
  6. Brock JW (2005) The automobile industry. In: Adams W, Brock J (eds) The structure of American industry. Person Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, pp 96–118Google Scholar
  7. Brock JW (2009) The automobile industry. In: Brock J (ed) The structure of American industry. Person Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, pp 155–182Google Scholar
  8. Chaloupka FJ (2007) Cigarettes: old firms facing new challenges. In: Tremblay VJ, Tremblay CH (eds) Industry and firm studies. M.E. Sharpe, Amonk, NY, pp 80–118Google Scholar
  9. Cheng R (2011) 2nd update: Microsoft agrees to buy Skype for $8.5 Billion, Wall Street Journal, May 10, 2011Google Scholar
  10. Curfman GD, Morrissey S, Drazen JM (2009) Tobacco, public health, and the FDA. New Engl J Med 23:402–403CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Eckard EW Jr (1991) Competition and the cigarette TV advertising ban. Econ Inq 29:119–133CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Elzinga KG (1990) The beer industry. In: Adams W (ed) The structure of American industry. MacMillan Publishing Co., New YorkGoogle Scholar
  13. Elzinga KG (2009) The beer industry. In: Brock J (ed) The structure of American industry. Person Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJGoogle Scholar
  14. Farr S, Tremblay Carol Horton, Tremblay Victor J (2001) The welfare effect of advertising restrictions in the U.S. Cigarette industry. Rev Ind Organ 18(2):147–160CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Fizel JL, Bennett RW (2009) The college sports industry. In: Brock J (ed) The structure of American industry. Person Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJGoogle Scholar
  16. Fort R (2007) The sports industry and antitrust. In: Tremblay VJ, Tremblay CH (eds) Industry and firm studies. Armonk, NY, M.E. Sharpe, pp 245–266Google Scholar
  17. George LM (2009) National television and the market for local products: the case of beer. J Ind Econ 57(1):85–111CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. George LM (2011) The growth of television and the decline of local beer. In: Swinnen JFM (ed) The economics of beer. Oxford University Press, New York, pp 213–226CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Goldfarb A (2007) Schlitz: why the Schlitz hit the fan. In: Tremblay VJ, Tremblay CH (eds) Industry and firm studies. Armonk, NY, M.E. Sharpe, pp 293–320Google Scholar
  20. Hay GA (2009) The cigarette industry. In: Brock J (ed) The structure of American industry. Person Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJGoogle Scholar
  21. Horton BJ (2010) The TARP Bailout of GM: A legal, historical, and literary critique. Texas Rev Law Polit 14:216–275Google Scholar
  22. Ikenson DJ (2011) Lasting implications of the general motors bailout. June 22, 2011, Available at http://www.Cato.org
  23. Iwasaki N, Tremblay VJ (2009) The effect of marketing regulations on efficiency: LeChatelier versus coordination effects. J Prod Anal 32(1):41–54CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Kahn LM (2007) Cartel behavior and amateurism in college sports. J Econ Perspect 21(1):209–226, WinterCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Kennedy R (1967) Proceedings of the first world conference on smoking and health. American Cancer Society, New York, pp 4–13Google Scholar
  26. Kleessen A (2009) Microsoft aims big guns at Google, Ask consumers to rethink search. Advertising Age, May 25, 2009Google Scholar
  27. Lazaroff DE (2007) The NCAA in its second century: defender of amateurism or antitrust recidivist. Oregon Law Rev 86(2):329–371Google Scholar
  28. Norton SW (2007) General motors: lost dominance. In: Tremblay VJ, Tremblay CH (eds) Industry and firm studies. Amonk, NY, M.E. Sharpe, pp 269–292Google Scholar
  29. Pitofsky R (1977) Beyond Nader: consumer protection and the regulation of advertising. Harv Law Rev 90(4):661–701CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Pollay RW (1994) Promises, promises: self-regulation of US cigarette broadcast advertising in the 1960s. Tob Control 3:134–144CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Sack AL (1991) The underground economy of college football. Sociol Sport J 8(1):1–15Google Scholar
  32. Saloojee Y, Dagli E (2000) Tobacco industry tactics for resisting public policy on health. Bull World Health Organ 78(7):1–12Google Scholar
  33. Sloan FA, Ostermann J, Picone G, Conover C, Taylor DH (2004) The price of smoking. MIT Press, Cambridge MAGoogle Scholar
  34. Steinberg CS (1980) TV facts. Facts on File, Inc., New YorkGoogle Scholar
  35. Tremblay CH, Tremblay VJ (2011b) Recent economic developments in the import and craft segments of the U.S. brewing industry. In: Swinnen JFM (ed) The economics of beer. Oxford University Press, New York, pp 141–160CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Tremblay VJ, Iwasaki N, Tremblay CH (2005) The dynamics of industry concentration for U.S. micro and macro brewers. Rev Ind Organ 26(3):307–324CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Tremblay VJ, Tremblay CH (2005) The U.S. brewing industry: data and economic analysis. MIT Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  38. Tremblay VJ, Tremblay CH (2007) Brewing: games firms play. In: Tremblay CH, Tremblay VJ (eds) Industry and firm studies. ME Sharpe, Armonk, NYGoogle Scholar
  39. White LJ (1971) The US automobile industry since 1945. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MAGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Victor J. Tremblay
    • 1
  • Carol Horton Tremblay
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsOregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA

Personalised recommendations