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Educational Technology in Social Studies Education

Abstract

The National Council for the Social Studies, the largest professional organization for social studies educators, indicates that the primary purpose of the social studies is to help youth become responsible citizens who are capable of making informed and reasoned decisions for the good of society. For this purpose to be met, students need to understand a vast domain of knowledge and have the skills to think critically, problem-solve, collaborate, and act conscientiously in addressing complex issues. This means that teachers need to learn how to use innovative approaches to engage students as thinkers and problem solvers so students may be successful global citizens and leaders of the twenty-first century. Designing an environment where students have the opportunity to learn and practice these skills while exploring social studies content can be challenging, but not impossible. A key component is the essential role educational technology and twenty-first century skills have in facilitating teaching and learning in the social studies. This chapter provides an overview of the research on how educational technology has been used to engage and inspire all learners to be creative and critical thinkers, not only for the good of their individual futures, but for the future of our global society. In providing the overview, the focus is on two major areas within social studies education—historical inquiry and civic education.

Keywords

Twenty-first century skills Historical inquiry Civic education 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Timothy Green
    • 1
  • Jennifer Ponder
    • 1
  • Loretta Donovan
    • 1
  1. 1.California State UniversityFullertonUSA

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