The Presence of Culture in Learning

Chapter

Abstract

The selection of instructional strategies for learners requires consideration of the role of culture in learning. This chapter reviews current research across disciplines (i.e., mathematics, science, and e-learning) to provide a critical analysis of applications and conceptualizations of culture in learning. Given this research, implications for culture-based instructional strategies are offered.

Keywords

Culture Learning Instructional strategies Culture-specific Science Mathematics e-learning 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Maryland Baltimore CountyBaltimoreUSA

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