Educational Design Research

Chapter

Abstract

Educational design research is a genre of research in which the iterative development of solutions to practical and complex educational problems provides the setting for scientific inquiry. The solutions can be educational products, processes, programs, or policies. Educational design research not only targets solving significant problems facing educational practitioners but at the same time seeks to discover new knowledge that can inform the work of others facing similar problems. Working systematically and simultaneously toward these dual goals is perhaps the most defining feature of educational design research. This chapter seeks to clarify the nature of educational design research by distinguishing it from other types of inquiry conducted in the field of educational communications and technology. Examples of design research conducted by different researchers working in the field of educational communications and technology are described. The chapter concludes with a discussion of several important issues facing educational design researchers as they pursue future work using this innovative research approach.

Keywords

Design research Design-based research Formative research Design experiments 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Open University of the Netherlands & University of TwenteEnschedeThe Netherlands
  2. 2.College of EducationThe University of GeorgiaAthensUSA

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