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Diagnostics and Repairs in Fluid Construction Grammar

  • Katrien Beuls
  • Remi van Trijp
  • Pieter Wellens
Chapter

Abstract

Linguistic utterances are full of errors and novel expressions, yet linguistic communication is remarkably robust. This paper presents a double-layered architecture for open-ended language processing, in which ‘diagnostics’ and ‘repairs’ operate on a meta-level for detecting and solving problems that may occur during habitual processing on a routine layer. Through concrete operational examples, this paper demonstrates how such an architecture can directly monitor and steer linguistic processing, and how language can be embedded in a larger cognitive system.

Key words

Fluid Construction Grammar language processing robustness 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katrien Beuls
    • 1
  • Remi van Trijp
    • 2
  • Pieter Wellens
    • 1
  1. 1.VUB AI-LabVrije Universiteit BrusselBrusselsBelgium
  2. 2.Sony Computer Science Laboratory ParisParisFrance

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