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Treatment Methods Commonly Used in Conjunction with Functional Assessment

  • Nicole M. Rodriguez
  • Wayne W. Fisher
  • Michael E. Kelley
Chapter
Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

Treatments designed to address the function of behavior have become a hallmark of behavior analysis. To identify environmental variables maintaining problem behavior, a functional analysis is typically conducted prior to developing treatment. This process allows the clinician or researcher to understand why the problem behavior occurs such that the treatment can be tailored to address those variables (e.g., by rearranging reinforcement contingencies or addressing the motivating operation).

Keywords

Problem Behavior Discriminative Stimulus Functional Communication Training Automatic Reinforcement Response Blocking 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nicole M. Rodriguez
    • 1
  • Wayne W. Fisher
    • 1
  • Michael E. Kelley
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders, Munroe-Meyer InstituteUniversity of Nebraska Medical CenterOmahaUSA

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