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Radiography

  • Ramon SanchezEmail author
  • Peter J. Strouse
Chapter
  1. I.
    Introduction
    1. A.

      Conventional chest radiography is the primary imaging modality used for the evaluation of the neonatal chest.

       
    2. B.

      Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and fluoroscopy are less commonly used but are valuable in selected cases.

       
     
  2. II.
    Conventional radiography
    1. A.
      Introduction
      1. 1.

        With conventional radiography, electrical energy is received and converted into X-rays. These X-rays create an image after penetrating an object.

         
      2. 2.

        Chest radiographs are usually done portably at the bedside.

         
      3. 3.

        Most incubators incorporate X-ray tray devices to minimize manipulation of patients.

         
      4. 4.

        Conventional film screen radiography has largely been replaced by digital radiology systems. This new technology allows almost immediate availability of images, different visualization options, electronic archiving, transmission in networks and have the potential to decrease the radiation dose.

         
      5. 5.

        The anteroposterior (AP) view is the primary projection...

Keywords

Pleural Effusion Esophageal Atresia Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Tracheal Stenosis Pulmonary Sequestration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Suggested Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Section of Pediatric RadiologyUniversity of Michigan, C.S. Mott Children’s HospitalAnn ArborUSA

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