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Part II Commentary: Motivation and Engagement: Conceptual, Operational, and Empirical Clarity

  • Andrew J. Martin
Chapter

Abstract

A noted scholar in the field of engagement, Andrew Martin, provided commentary on the chapters in Part II. Martin summarized the theories and definitions offered by authors in this part and shared his perspective on motivation and engagement. He argued for the inclusion of disengagement in addition to engagement in future research and discourse in this area. Martin concluded by proposing a framework and analytic model to integrate authors’ ideas and to test tenets of various conceptualizations of engagement and motivation.

Keywords

Goal Orientation Cognitive Engagement Emotional Engagement Goal Structure Behavioral Engagement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Education and Social WorkUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia

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