Eastern Arctic Under Pressure: From Paleoeskimo to Inuit Culture (Canada and Greenland)

Chapter

Abstract

Pressure microblade production (Fig. 15.1) appeared with the arrival of the Paleoeskimo people (4500–800 B.P.) in the Eastern Arctic, long after the technique was established in other areas of the world. Previous assumptions have all too quickly proposed that the Paleoeskimo produced microblades by ‘pressing them off’ from the core. As a result, there was no real attempt made to analyse the techniques employed to detach microblades in later studies. In addition, early studies did not focus on lithic technology in any great detail, which likely explains why our present knowledge is limited with regard to detachment techniques in the Arctic. This study seeks to improve upon our current knowledge of the detachment technique for microblade production employed by the Paleoeskimo.

Keywords

Migration Quartz Agate Europe Stratigraphy 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We are grateful to Max Friesen for carefully reviewing this paper and would like to thank David Howard and Benjamin Pateneaude who greatly helped us to improve the English.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Avataq Cultural InstituteWestmountCanada
  2. 2.Department of ArchaeologyUniversity of CopenhagenCopenhagenDenmark

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