Skip to main content

A Framework for Healthcare Planning and Control

Part of the International Series in Operations Research & Management Science book series (ISOR,volume 168)

Abstract

Rising expenditures spur health care organizations to organize their processes more efficiently and effectively. Unfortunately, health care planning and control lags behind manufacturing planning and control. We analyze the existing planning and control concepts or frameworks for health care operations management and find that they do not address various important planning and control problems. We conclude that they only focus on hospitals and are too narrow, focusing on a single managerial area, such as resource capacity planning, or ignoring hierarchical levels. We propose a modern framework for health care planning and control that integrates all managerial areas in health care delivery operations and all hierarchical levels of control, to ensure completeness and coherence of responsibilities for every managerial area. The framework can be used to structure the various planning and control functions and their interaction. It is applicable to an individual department, an entire health care organization, and to a complete supply chain of cure and care providers. The framework can be used to identify and position various types of managerial problems, to demarcate the scope of organization interventions and to facilitate a dialogue between clinical staff and managers.

Keywords

  • Planning Horizon
  • Hierarchical Level
  • Health Care Delivery
  • Managerial Area
  • Operational Planning

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4614-1734-7_12
  • Chapter length: 18 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   109.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-1-4614-1734-7
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   149.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book
USD   199.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Fig. 12.1
Fig. 12.2

References

  • Anthony RN (1965) Planning and control systems: a framework for analysis. Harvard Business School Division of Research, Boston

    Google Scholar 

  • Blake JT, Carter MW (1997) Surgical process scheduling: a structured review. J Soc Health Syst 5:17–30

    Google Scholar 

  • Brailsford SC, Vissers JMH (2010) OR in health care: a European perspective. Eur J Oper Res 212(2):223–234

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Brailsford SC, Harper PR, Patel B, Pitt M (2009) An analysis of the academic literature on simulation and modeling in health care. J Simul 3:130–140

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Butler TW, Karwan KR, Sweigart JR (1992) Multi-level strategic evaluation of hospital plans and decisions. J Operational Res Society 43(7):665–675

    Google Scholar 

  • Butler TW, Keong Leong G, Everett LN (1996) The operations management role in hospital strategic planning. J Operations Manage 14:137–156

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Carter M (2002) Diagnosis: mismanagement of resources. OR/MS today 29(2):26–32

    Google Scholar 

  • CHOIR (2011) Center for health care Operations Improvement and Research at the University of Twente. http://www.utwente.nl/choir/. Accessed 12 July 2011

  • Dale J, Lang H, Roberts JA, Green J, Glucksmann E (1996) Cost effectiveness of treating primary care patients in accident and emergency: a comparison between general practitioners, senior house officers, and registrars. Br Med J 312:1340–1344

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Dash A (2009) Lost + found: making the right choice in equipment location systems. Healthc Facility Manage 22(11):19–21

    Google Scholar 

  • De Vries G, Bertrand JWM, Vissers JMH (1999) Design requirements for health care production control systems. Production Plan Control 10:559–569

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Delesie L (1998) Bridging the gap between clinicians and health managers. Eur J Oper Res 105(2):248–256

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Glouberman S, Mintzberg H (2001a) Managing the care of health and the cure of disease—part I: differentiation. Health Care Manage Rev 26:56–69

    Google Scholar 

  • Glouberman S, Mintzberg H (2001b) Managing the care of health and the cure of disease—part II: integration. Healthc Manage Rev 26:70–84

    Google Scholar 

  • Graves SC (2002) Manufacturing planning and control. In: Pardalos P, Resende M (eds) Handbook of applied optimization. Oxford University Press, New York, pp 728–746

    Google Scholar 

  • Grol R, Giesen PHJ, van Uden C (2006) After-hours care in the United Kingdom, Denmark, and the Netherlands: new models. Health Aff 25(6):1733–1737

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Hans EW, Herroelen WS, Leus R, Wullink G (2003) A hierarchical approach to multi-project planning under uncertainty. Omega 35(5):563–577

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Hax AC, Meal HC (1975) Hierarchical integration of production planning and scheduling. In: Geisler M (ed) TIMS Studies in the management sciences: logistics. North Holland-American Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp 53–69

    Google Scholar 

  • Johnson G, Scholes K, Whittington R (2008) Exploring corporate strategy, 8th edn. Prentice Hall, New Jersey

    Google Scholar 

  • Khoumbati K, Themistocleous M, Irani Z (2006) Evaluating the adoption of enterprise application integration in health-care organizations. J Manage Inf Syst 22(4):69–108

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Lattimer V, Turnbull J, Burgess A, Surridge H, Gerard K, Lathlean J, Smith H, George S (2005) Effect of introduction of integrated out of hours care in England: observational study. Br Med J 331(7508):81–84

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Laudon KC, Laudon JP (2010) Management information systems, 11th edn. Prentice Hall, New Jersey

    Google Scholar 

  • Li LX, Benton WC, Keong Leong G (2002) The impact of strategic operations management decisions on community hospital performance. J Oper Manage 20:389–408

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Marri HB, Gunasekaran A, Grieve RJ (1998) Computer-aided process planning: a state of art. Int J Adv Manuf Technol 14(4):261–268

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Maynard A (1991) Developing the health care market. Econ J 101(408):1277–1286

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Maynard A (1994) Can competition enhance efficiency in health care? Lessons from the reform of the U.K. National Health Service. Soc Sci Med 39(10):1433–1445

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • OECD (2011) Data from 2011 from the website of Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development. http://www.oecd.org/health. Accessed 12 July 2011

  • ORAHS (2011) Operational Research Applied to Health Services. http://orahs.di.unito.it/. Accessed 12 July 2011

  • Orlicky J (1975) Material requirements planning. McGraw-Hill, London

    Google Scholar 

  • Ozcan YA (2009) Quantitative methods in health care management—techniques and applications, 2nd edn. Jossey-Bass/Wiley, San Francisco, pp 6–9

    Google Scholar 

  • Porter ME, Teisberg EO (2007) How physicians can change the future of health care. J American Med Assoc 297:1103–1111

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Rhyne D, Jupp D (1988) Health care requirements planning: a conceptual framework. Healthc Manage Rev 13(1):17–27

    Google Scholar 

  • Roth AV, van Dierdonck R (1995) Hospital resource planning. Prod Operat Manage 4:2–29

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Van Harten WH, Hans EW, Van Lent WAM (2010) Aanpak efficiency te ondoordacht (in Dutch, translation: approach to efficiency often ill-considered). Medisch Contact 6:264–267

    Google Scholar 

  • Van Uden CJ, Ament AJ, Voss GB, Wesseling G, Winkens RA, Van Schayck OC, Crebolder HF (2006) Out-of-hours primary care. Implications of organisation on costs. BMC Family Practice 7(1):29

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Vissers JMH (1998) Patient flow-based allocation of inpatient resources: a case study. Eur J Oper Res 105:356–370

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Vissers JMH, Beech R (2005) Health operations management. Routledge, London

    Google Scholar 

  • Vissers JMH, Bertrand JWM, De Vries G (2001) A framework for production control in health care organizations. Prod Plan Control 12:591–604

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Wachtel RE, Dexter F (2008) Tactical increases in operating room block time for capacity planning should not be based on utilization. Anesthesia Analgesia 106(1):215–226

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Westert GP, Burgers JS, Verkleij H (2009) The Netherlands: regulated competition behind the dykes? Br Med J 339:839–842

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Zijm WHM (2000) Towards intelligent manufacturing planning and control systems. OR Spectrum 22:313–345

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

Download references

Acknowledgments

This research is supported by the Dutch Technology Foundation STW, applied science division of NWO and the Technology Program of the Ministry of Economic Affairs.

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Erwin W. Hans .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Hans, E.W., van Houdenhoven, M., Hulshof, P.J.H. (2012). A Framework for Healthcare Planning and Control. In: Hall, R. (eds) Handbook of Healthcare System Scheduling. International Series in Operations Research & Management Science, vol 168. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-1734-7_12

Download citation