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Cooling Water Systems: Efficiency vis-à-vis Environment

  • Sanjeevi Rajagopal
  • Vayalam P. Venugopalan
  • Henk A. Jenner
Chapter

Abstract

Human beings use water for different purposes. Among the various uses, industrial use is by far the largest single class of use, especially so in developed countries. Among the various industries, power generation industry ranks as the largest user of water, where water is used mostly as a cooling fluid. A large 2,000 MWe direct cooled plant requires about four million cubic metres of water daily for cooling. This huge requirement is met from a suitable source such as river, lake or coastal sea and returned, fully or partially, depending on the type of the cooling water circuit. Therefore, it must be borne in mind that this water is not consumed in the process; it is simply abstracted and then returned to the source water body.

Keywords

Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Water Rankine Cycle Cooling Water System Receive Water Body 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This project was partly funded by the European Commission in the Community’s Sixth Framework Programme (INCO project, Contract number: PL510658, TBT Impacts) and Faculty of Science, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands. This is contribution number 527 of the Centre for Wetland Ecology (CWE).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sanjeevi Rajagopal
    • 1
  • Vayalam P. Venugopalan
    • 2
  • Henk A. Jenner
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Animal Ecology and Ecophysiology, Institute for Water and Wetland ResearchRadboud University NijmegenNijmegenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Biofouling and Biofilm Processes Section, Water and Steam Chemistry DivisionBARC FacilitiesKalpakkamIndia
  3. 3.Aquator BVWageningenThe Netherlands

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