The Next Decade of Eurogang Program Research

  • Malcolm W. Klein
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses barriers to effective future Eurogang comparative research as well as suggestions for new emphases in such research. The barriers are similar to those in non-gang research studies, but to these, I add pressing issues of a standardized definition of street gangs as well as greater attention to group-level processes. Recommended emphases for the future include prospective research designs, multimethod designs, longitudinal designs, and involvement in evaluations of gang control programs.

Keywords

Europe Crime Syndicate Vigil 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Malcolm W. Klein
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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