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Views on National Security in the Middle East

  • Lane Smith
  • Mohammad Bahramzadeh
  • Sherri McCarthy
  • Tristyn Campbell
  • Majed Ashy
  • Helena Syna Desivilya
  • Abdul Kareem Al-Obaidi
  • Kamala Smith
  • Alev Yalcinkaya
  • William Tastle
  • Feryal Turan
  • Dalit Yassour-Boroschowitz
  • Rouba Youssef
Chapter
Part of the Peace Psychology Book Series book series (PPBS)

Abstract

Unlike much of the rest of the world, government policy toward national security in the Middle East has generally been determined by decisions made by countries outside of the region. The Middle East, a term sometimes considered “Eurocentric” (Adelson 1995; Koppes 1976), is used to designate a region of countries at the intersection of Africa, Asia, and Europe. The region includes between 20 and 40 countries, including at least the following: Afghanistan, Algeria, Bahrain, Cyprus, Egypt, Iraq, Iran, Israel, Jordon, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Oman, Pakistan, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen (see www.mideastweb.org for more information). The countries comprise a diverse mosaic of languages, traditions, and histories and are difficult to characterize as a group.

Keywords

Saudi Arabia Middle East National Security Gulf Cooperation Council Security Agenda 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lane Smith
    • 1
  • Mohammad Bahramzadeh
    • 2
  • Sherri McCarthy
    • 3
  • Tristyn Campbell
    • 4
  • Majed Ashy
    • 5
  • Helena Syna Desivilya
    • 6
  • Abdul Kareem Al-Obaidi
    • 7
  • Kamala Smith
    • 8
  • Alev Yalcinkaya
    • 9
  • William Tastle
    • 10
  • Feryal Turan
    • 11
  • Dalit Yassour-Boroschowitz
    • 12
  • Rouba Youssef
    • 13
  1. 1.University of Maryland - College ParkCollege ParkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Political ScienceArizona Western UniversityYumaUSA
  3. 3.Educational Psychology, Counseling and Human RelationsNorthern Arizona UniversityYumaUSA
  4. 4.Psychology DepartmentBoston UniversityBostonUSA
  5. 5.Psychology DepartmentBay State CollegeNorth AndoverUSA
  6. 6.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyYezreel Valley CollegeEmek YezreelIsrael
  7. 7.Institute of International EducationNew YorkUSA
  8. 8.Abt AssociatesCambridgeUSA
  9. 9.Department of PsychologyYeditepe UniversityInstanbulTurkey
  10. 10.Ithaca College, School of BusinessIthacaUSA
  11. 11.Department of SociologyAnkara UniversityAnkaraTurkey
  12. 12.Department of Human ServicesEmek Yezreel CollegeEmek YezreelIsrael
  13. 13.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Rhode IslandKingstonUSA

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