Technological Approach

  • Flaura K. Winston
  • Kristy B. Arbogast
  • Joseph Kanianthra
Chapter

Abstract

Injuries result from exposure to energy that exceeds the body’s ability to manage or dissipate it. As a key element in a comprehensive injury prevention strategy, technology-focused engineering design can minimize exposure to high-energy events, reduce the incidence or severity of injury given an event, and improve the long-term outcome given an injury. In order to illustrate the technological approach to injury prevention, this chapter focuses on drivers and their occupants and presents current and emerging technology-based strategies to prevent crashes and minimize the energy transfer during a crash. The successes of current safety engineering are presented here in the context of the Haddon Matrix with a call for a new, more integrated approach in order to achieve the next advances in safety technology. Through the use of sensors, computers, and algorithms, emerging technological strategies work on the scale of milliseconds to minutes and require designers to simultaneously consider the driver/occupant, vehicle, and environment in order to stage a continuous response that manages the precrash, crash, and postcrash scenarios.

Abbreviations

ATD

Anthropomorphic test device

CIREN

Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network

FARS

Fatality Analysis Reporting System

NASS

National Automotive Sampling System

NCAP

New Car Assessment Program

NHTSA

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

PMHS

Postmortem human subject

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Flaura K. Winston
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kristy B. Arbogast
    • 3
  • Joseph Kanianthra
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics, Perelman School of MedicineUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Center for Injury Research and PreventionThe Children’s Hospital of PhiladelphiaPhiladelphiaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Pediatrics, Perelman School of MedicineUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  4. 4.Active Safety EngineeringLLCAshburnUSA

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