Contralateral Efferent Regulation of Human Cochlear Tuning: Behavioural Observations and Computer Model Simulations

  • Enrique A. Lopez-Poveda
  • Enzo Aguilar
  • Peter T. Johannesen
  • Almudena Eustaquio-Martín
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (volume 787)

Abstract

In binaural listening, the two cochleae do not act as independent sound receptors; their functioning is linked via the contralateral medial olivo-cochlear reflex (MOCR), which can be activated by contralateral sounds. The present study aimed at characterizing the effect of a contralateral white noise (CWN) on psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs). PTCs were measured in forward masking for probe frequencies of 500 Hz and 4 kHz, with and without CWN. The sound pressure level of the probe was fixed across conditions. PTCs for different response criteria were measured by using various masker-probe time gaps. The CWN had no significant effects on PTCs at 4 kHz. At 500 Hz, by contrast, PTCs measured with CWN appeared broader, particularly for short gaps, and they showed a decrease in the masker level. This decrease was greater the longer the masker-probe time gap. A computer model of forward masking with efferent control of cochlear gain was used to explain the data. The model accounted for the data based on the assumption that the sole effect of the CWN was to reduce the cochlear gain by ∼6.5 dB at 500 Hz for low and moderate levels. It also suggested that the pattern of data at 500 Hz is the result of combined broad bandwidth of compression and off-frequency listening. Results are discussed in relation with other physiological and psychoacoustical studies on the effect of activation of MOCR on cochlear function.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Enrique A. Lopez-Poveda
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Enzo Aguilar
    • 1
    • 2
  • Peter T. Johannesen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Almudena Eustaquio-Martín
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Instituto de Neurociencias de Castilla y LeónUniversidad de SalamancaSalamancaSpain
  2. 2.Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas de SalamancaUniversidad de SalamancaSalamancaSpain
  3. 3.Departamento de Cirugía, Facultad de MedicinaUniversidad de SalamancaSalamancaSpain

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