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The Long Duration: The Cultural History of Yucatán

  • Sam R. Sweitz
Chapter
Part of the Contributions To Global Historical Archaeology book series (CGHA, volume 3)

Abstract

In Annales methodology, the long duration encompasses forces that act at the longest wavelength of time. This includes the historical trajectory of civilizations and the gradual, cumulative processes of culture change. The long duration is characterized by slowly changing forces including stable technologies, ideologies, and worldviews. The previous chapter explored the long-term geological, environmental, and climatological patterns that provided the stage on which Maya culture has waxed and waned over the last four millennia. Chronologically, I focus on the most part to the cultural history of the Maya in this region during the Classic and Postclassic periods, ca. A.D. 250 to the Spanish Conquest; my regional focus will be limited to the northern part of the Yucatán peninsula.

Keywords

Extended Family Classic Period Corporate Group Extended Household Maya Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Social SciencesMichigan Technological UniversityHoughtonUSA

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