An Analysis of Educational Technology-Related Doctoral Programs in the United States

  • Heng-Yu Ku
  • Shari Plantz-Masters
  • Kim Hosler
  • Watsatree Diteeyont
  • Chatchada Akarasriworn
  • Tzong-Yih Lin
Chapter
Part of the Educational Media and Technology Yearbook book series (EMTY, volume 36)

Abstract

This descriptive study seeks to understand the differing requirements of doctoral programs in educational technology-related fields in the United States. Using a document analysis approach with five data sources, we found 59 different institutions (55 campus-based and 4 online) offered doctoral degrees with 33 different degree titles that satisfied a foundational set of curriculum criteria. Among these 59 institutions, total credit hours requirements ranged from 42 credit hours to 113 credit hours and total dissertation credit hours spanned from 1 to 45 credit hours to complete a doctoral degree. Among the nine universities who offered both Ph.D. and Ed.D. degrees, the requirements of the total credit hours were varied, but the same or higher total dissertation hours were required for the Ph.D. program than for the Ed.D. program.

Keywords

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heng-Yu Ku
    • 1
  • Shari Plantz-Masters
    • 1
  • Kim Hosler
    • 1
  • Watsatree Diteeyont
    • 1
  • Chatchada Akarasriworn
    • 1
  • Tzong-Yih Lin
    • 1
  1. 1.Educational Technology Program, College of Education and Behavioral SciencesUniversity of Northern ColoradoGreeleyUSA

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